ʻATENISI INSTITUTE

An institute for critical education in the South Pacific

A ʻAtenisi picture

Inducted fellows with Dr Helu and Hon PM Sevele (2009)

NATURAL SCIENCES

Bio. 100 • Introduction to biology • Prerequisites: none

This course provides an introduction to biological principles, examining the levels of biological hierarchy from the microscopic to the global scale. Topics include: the structures and functions of animal cells and cell division; genetics and its role in the evolution of populations; an overview of sub-fields of ecology (population, behavioural, community) as well as conservation/restoration ecology. This course is intended to provide a basis in biology for students intending to further their study in scientific fields. Because the topics covered are not taught in-depth, it is also appropriate for non-science majors. Textbook Biology (international 7th ed), Campbell & Reece

Chem. 100 • Introduction to chemistry with physics • Prerequisites: none

A general introduction into chemistry, with an emphasis on the properties of materials and biological systems. Atoms, molecules, mole concept, chemical equations, stoichiometry; electron configuration, bonding; molecular structure; energy changes and kinetic factors in chemical reactions; aqueous chemistry; introductory organic chemistry. The physical aspect of the course is presented by a detailed investigation of atomic models concerning their chemical properties. Although this course is intended for science students, its wide survey makes it also suitable for those those majoring in arts. Textbook Kotz, John C., Treichel, Paul., Weaver, Gabriela, C. Chemistry & chemical reactivity. 6th ed. Thomson Brooks/Cole, 2006

Math. 102 • Introduction to linear algebra • Prerequisites: none

This course follows the text Contemporary Linear Algebra by Anton & Busby, teaching proof as an important tool. The class initially covers vectors in n-space (including dot products and vector equations of lines and plans), proceeding to systems of linear equations and the focus of the course – matrices. This entails the examination of the inverse of a matrix, the geometry of a system described by a matrix, determinants and vector cross products, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and matrix models such as dynamical systems and Markov chains. The fundamental structure of matrices and general vector spaces previews abstract algebra.

Math. 110 • Introduction to calculus • Prerequisites: none

This course follows the text Calculus: Early Transcendentals by Anton et al. The class reviews the precalculus notion of a real function, particularly trigonometric, exponential and logarithmical functions. It introduces the notion of a limit, proceeding to a rigorous definition. The course next examines continuity, the derivative function and techniques of differentiation, including the differentiation of inverse trigonometric functions. Parametric functions and polar coordinates are treated, enabling the consideration of a variety of curves such as spirals, rose curves, and limaçons –this, to appreciate the aesthetics of calculus. Finally, the class studies techniques of integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Anthr. 100 • Introduction to anthropological theory and research • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Anthr. 200 • Intermediate anthropological theory and research • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Anthr. 300 • Advanced anthropological theory and research • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Whilst recognising the common roots and close links uniting the “four fields” of anthropology – linguistics, archaeology, physical anthropology, and cultural anthropology – as a holistic science of humanity, the course focuses on the sociocultural branch of the discipline. It examines the history of anthropology from the first ethnographers of Antiquity and the Middle Ages to the Renaissance and the Age of Enlightenment, and from the first developments of anthropology as a scientific discipline in the mid-nineteenth century to the more recent trends of the late twentieth. The evolution of key concepts – e.g., culture, society, and race – are traced through the study of the main theoretical schools of thought – e.g., evolutionism, functionalism, diffusionism, Marxism, and structuralism that developed in different sociocultural and historical contexts, often in response or critique to one another.

Econ. 100 • Introduction to economic thought and qualitative analysis • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Econ. 200 • Intermediate economic thought and qualitative analysis • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Econ. 300 • Advanced economic thought and qualitative analysis • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

A survey of economic thought and qualitative analysis for the liberal arts student. The economic perspective of ancient Greece, via Aristotle, and medieval Islam, via Ibn Khaldun, frames the ensuing Western European debate between mercantilism, physiocracy, and the simple capitalism proposed by Adam Smith. The course next considers the abuses of industrial capitalism and its catalysis of the Marxian critique. The class’ review of economic theory concludes by contrasting the 20th century dispute between command and free market economies. In the second semester, the course examines market fundamentals (e.g., demand, supply, equilibrium, clearance) and types of government intervention within the market. It next considers elasticity and cross-elasticity of demand, supply, price, substitution, and wealth, and the resulting categorisation of goods (e.g., normal, inferior, necessary, luxury). It lastly addresses the exigencies of production, including technology, inventory, scale, cash flow, costs, profit, opportunity, investment, loans, and return on investment. Special attention is paid to assessment of demand and cost, including informed prediction of fixed, variable, and labour costs.

Pol.St. 110 • International relations • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Pol.St. 210 • Intermediate international relations • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Pol.St. 310 • Advanced international relations • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

International relations theory attempts to answer the question, ‘Why do states behave the way they do in the international system?’ The course will follow the outline proposed by Stephen Walt in 1998 when he wrote, “The study of international affairs is best understood as a protracted competition between the realist, liberal, and radical traditions.” The class will assess these main theories proposed by foreign policy and international relations thinkers and test them against the evidence of state practise. To varying degrees each theory is reductive and essentialist … and students will be prompted to critique each hypothesis through research as individuals and as a class. The course will additionally consider the ideas of philosophers, scholars and statesmen such as Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, Vladimir Lenin, Henry Kissinger, and Mahatma Gandhi … and finally examine the architecture of contemporary international relations and organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organisation, and the Pacific Islands Forum.

Pol.St. 105 • Introduction to political philosophy • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Pol.St. 205 • Intermediate political philosophy • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Pol.St. 305 • Advanced political philosophy • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

A survey of Biblical, European and U.S. political thought from ancient Israel and Greece to Christian Reconstruction. The initial democratic idealism of Solon, Cleisthenes, and Pericles is placed in counterpoint to the empiricism of Aristotle and Macchiavelli … as well as the elitism of Plato, Augustine, and Hobbes. The liberalism of Locke, Montesquieu, and the U.S. and (early) French Revolution is next contrasted with the transcendentalism of Hegel and aesthetics of Nietzsche. The class continues with a review of 20th century authoritarian utopian ideologies, such as Fascism, National Socialism and Leninism. Finally, Christian and Islamic visions of international order are compared with the U.N. Charter. (Being a philosophy course as well, this course may also be used by students to fulfill humanities requirements.)

Soc/Psych. 110 • Introducation to social psychology • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Soc/Psych. 210 • Intermediate social psychology • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Soc/Psych. 310 • Advanced social psychology • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

An interdisciplinary examination of the psychology of social groups. The course initially traces the history of psychology from ancient Greece (e.g., Plato’s tripartite psyche) to medieval Islam (e.g., al-Tibari, ibn Zakarīya Rāzi) to the psychiatric pioneers of the French Revolution (e.g., Pinel, Esquirol), leading to the more recent psychology of Freud and Jung. The birth of social psychology is attributed to Triplett and LeBon, whilst the Allport brothers and Lewin are primarily credited with its further development in the 1930s. The discipline generally studies concepts of the self within groups, as well as social perception and attitudes; these components are then presumed to interactively shape social conformity, affiliation, cohesion, and cooperation,  as well as rebellion, alienation, aggression, and conflict. The course concludes by examining these building blocks of social psychology in the arenas of politics, the media, sports, law, business, and health.

HUMANITIES

Phil. 105 • Introduction to political philosophy • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Phil. 205 • Intermediate political philosophy • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

Phil. 305 • Advanced political philosophy • Prerequisites: (see instructor)

A survey of Biblical, European and U.S. political thought from ancient Israel and Greece to Christian Reconstruction. The initial democratic idealism of Solon, Cleisthenes, and Pericles is placed in counterpoint to the empiricism of Aristotle and Macchiavelli … as well as the elitism of Plato, Augustine, and Hobbes. The liberalism of Locke, Montesquieu, and the U.S. and (early) French Revolution is next contrasted with the transcendentalism of Hegel and aesthetics of Nietzsche. The class continues with a review of 20th century authoritarian utopian ideologies, such as Fascism, National Socialism and Leninism. Finally, Christian and Islamic visions of international order are compared with the U.N. Charter. (Being a political studies course as well, this course may also be used by students to fulfill social science requirements.)

E.L. 115 • Introduction to English verse

E.L. 215 • Intermediate English verse • Prerequisites: English 1

E.L. 315 • Advanced English verse • Prerequisites: English 2

The course provides a sense of the development of English literature through poetry. It begins with an appreciation of Anglo-Saxon culture through the epic “Beowulf” – Seamus Heaney’s working of the masterpiece is studied as both literature and a window to the world of the ancient Briton. Transitioning to the Late Middle Ages, Simon Armitage’s translation of “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” reflects a changed England and a changed English. Chaucer’s prologue to the Canterbury Tales is the first work studied in the original. Shakespeare’s sonnets and the work of Donne introduce the class to modern English, whilst Byron’s Corsair precursors popular culture in the contemporary sense. Finally, Philip Larkin’s poetry inaugurates a consideration of the modern vernacular.

Fr.L. 100 • Introduction to conversational French

The course focuses on everyday conversational French by emphasising oral and reading skills. It starts with basic introductions (e.g., name, age, queries about well-being). It next covers spatiotemporal descriptions (e.g., time, date, adverbs of space and time) as well as pronouns and possession markers. Students become competent in describing people and their environment, their activities, and their tastes, as well as coping in various situations whilst traveling (e.g., asking directions, reading a menu). The course primarily employs two tenses – the present and near future.

Sp.L. 100 • Elementary Spanish language

Introduction to Spanish as a foreign language – pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. Development of communicative skills through the practice of communicative functions, including reading, writing, and dialogue.

ARTS

Art 105 • Introduction to European painting • Prerequisites: none

The course focuses on European painting from the Renaissance period, which began around the 14th century, and the post-impressionist period, which ended at the beginning of the 20th century. The aim is to study famous paintings from very well-known artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Van Gogh, and Renoir to understand how they reflect the history and culture of European nations. It looks at the evolution of technique, the representation of beauty, and the topics of interest during different historical periods. It will not only consider the influence of morals, religion, and politics, but also how each artist expressed his own feelings, tastes and skills, leading to beautiful innovations. The course aims to open a different kind of window on European history and culture, one that will appeal to the artistic and observation sense of the student.

Mus. 100 • Music theory

Mus. 200 • Music theory

Introduction to the fundamentals of music, focusing on identifying tones and pitches (as well as their rhythm and duration) bass and treble clefs, scales, intervals, key signatures, and harmonic analysis. Using these musical building blocks, students will develop practical skills in keyboard, ear and sight training, voice leading, and harmony construction.